VISITED: 014920
 
    

Center for Remote Sensing (Annual Report - 2001)

Acting Director, CRS Professor and Chairman, Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department University of Florida

Facility

The Center for Remote Sensing (CRS) is located in room 280, Frazier Rogers Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The building, which houses the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Dept. (ABE), was extensively remodeled during 1999-2001. The CRS facility currently consists of an entirely new laboratory, with adjoining rooms for lab manager and graduated research assistants. CRS equipment includes computers (two Sun stations and several Windows PCs), radiometers, imagers, digital cameras, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), aerial photography analysis devices, APT weather-satellite ground station, etc. CRS software resources include image-processing (ERDAS-Imagine, RSI-ENVI, Clarklabs-Idrisi), visualization (RSI-IDL, RSI-Noesys), and geographic information systems (GIS) (ESRI-ArcGIS, ESRI-Arc View, Clarklabs-Cartalinx).

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Personnel

Acting Director:Dr. C. Direlle Baird (Chairman and Professor, ABE).
Associate Director:Dr. Jasmeet Judge (Assistant Professor, ABE); joined CRS in 3rd quarter 2001.
Researcher:Dr. Jonathan D. Jordan (Assistant-In, ABE).
Laboratory Manager:Mr. Orlando Lanni (ABE).
Graduate Research Assistants:five were supported by the CRS during 2001;
graduations during that time included—
Chung-Hsin Juan (Ph.D.), now at Office of National Science and Technology Program for Hazards Mitigation, Taipei, Taiwan.
John C. Craig (Ph.D.), now Remote Sensing Manager at 3001 Inc., Gainesville, FL.
Kai-Jen Tien (M.E.), continuing on for Ph.D.
Current doctoral graduate students include Assefa M. Melesse, Keng-Liang Huang, and Kai-Jen Tien. One additional graduate student position is planned to be filled by2nd quarter 2002.

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Accomplishments

The CRS accomplishments during this fiscal year are briefly summarized as follows.

1. Teaching
 

Regular Courses:two regular graduate-level courses are taught by the CRS. AOM54312 “Remote Sensing and GIS in Agriculture and National Resources” is taught each fall semester (primary instructor J. D. Jordan); it serves as an introductory remote sensing/GIS course. ABE6262 “Remote Sensing in Hydrology” is taught each spring semester (primary instructor J. Judge); it is an advanced remote sensing applications course. Both of these courses count toward the University of Florida’s graduate-level Interdisciplinary Concentration in Geographic Information Systems (ICGIS) program. AOM5431 also count toward the ABE undergraduate minor programs in Precision Agriculture and Information Technology.

Short course:a four-week short course “Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems” is taught by CRS each summer semester (ordinarily in May). Short course attendees are usually administrators, engineers, and technicians from the Chinese Taipei Committee/International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage (CTC/ICID) in Taiwan. Training includes lectures, lab demonstrations, and fieldtrips (such as state agency remote sensing/GIS depts., CRS research partner organizations, and other sites).

UF Interdisciplinary Research Programs:the CRS faculty participate in University of Florida interdisciplinary programs, such as the Wetlands and Ecosystems Group (WEG) and Precision Agriculture and Remote Sensing (PARS) group. During 2001. the CRS planned the remote sensing portion of a major PARS cooperative research project into agricultural remote sensing (which began in January 2002 and will continue for three years). Additional cooperative research projects with WEG members, involving wetlands/hydrology remote sensing, are currently being pursued by CRS. 

2. Research, Recent
 
Hydrologic Applications (Taiwan and Florida):this three-year project, involving the integration of satellite remote sensing, GIS, and hydrologic modeling, was completed in 4th quarter 2001. It was supported by the Tsao-Jiin Memorial Foundation, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. CRS primary participants included Dr. S. F. Shih (original PI), Dr. J. Judge (current PI), Dr. J. D. Jordan, and graduate research assistants A.M.Melesse and K. J. Tien; another primary participant was Dr. C. H. Tan (CoI) of the Agricultural Engineering Research Center (Taiwan). Cooperating organizations included the Kaohsiung Irrigation Association in Taiwan, and the St. Johns River Water Management District in Florida.

Vegetation Stress Assessment Applications (Florida):this four-year project, comprising a feasibility study of airborne and satellite remote sensing, lidar, and GIS for wetland and upland vegetation stress assessment, was completed in 2nd quarter 2001. It was supported by NASA. CRS primary participants included Dr. S. F. Shih (original PI), Dr. J. D. Jordan (CoI), and graduate research assistants J. C. Crag and C. H. Juan. Cooperating organizations included NASA Stennis Space Flight Center, St. Johns River Water Management District, Indian River Research and Education Center, Citrus Research and Education Center, Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Midwest Research Institute, UF Weed Science dept, UF Civil Engineering Dept., and commercial citrus grower.

Agricultural Flood Damage Mapping (Florida):this one-year project, consisting of a pilot study into the integration of remote sensing, lidar, and GIS for delineating agricultural areas damaged by storm flooding, was completed in 4th quarter 2001. It was supported by the Florida Agricultural Extension Servicce. CRS primary participant was Dr. J. D. Jordan (CoI); other primary participants were Dade County Extension Director Don Pybas (PI), Dr. Wendy Graham (CoI), and ABE graduate student William Webb. Cooperating organizations included the Tropical Research and Education Center. 
3. Research, Current
 

Citrus Stress Assessment Applications (Florida):this three-year project began in 1st quarter 2002; it is a study into the feasibility of assessing citrus stress via integration of airborne and satellite remote sensing and GIS. This constitutes part of a larger, interdisciplinary, multi-state, tree-fruit precision agriculture project which is supported by USDA and NASA. CRS primary participant is Dr. J. D. Jordan (CoI; responsible for citrus remote sensing portion); other primary participants include Dr. T. L. Rhigetti (CoI) of Oregon State University, and many others. Cooperating organizations include the NASA Stennis Space Flight Center, Citrus Research and Education Center, Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture, and commercial citrus growers.

Wetland Vegetation/Nutrient Applications (Florida):this pilot study began in 1st quarter 2002. It is a cooperative research project between CRS and the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD), which comprised an analysis of vegetation reflectance, foliage nutrients, and soil nutrients in a central Florida wetland. CRS primary participants and Dr. J. D. Jordan (PI) and graduate student K. L. Huang; other primary participants include Dr. J. Prenger and Dr. M. Clark of UF Soil and Water Science dept. Cooperating organizations include the SJRWMD.

Irrigation Planning System-Applications (Ecuador):this two-year project began in 1st quarter 2001, and is supported by PROMSA. It involves the construction of a preliminary GIS database for agricultural irrigation planning in a semi-arid portion of Ecuador. CRS primary participant is Dr. J. D. Jordan; other primary participants include Dr. D. Z. Haman (PT) and ABE graduate student C. Cornejo. Cooperating organizations include CEDEGE and ESPOL (at Guayaquil University).  

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Presentation of certificates for the Class of 98’ for the Training Course on Remote Sensing at Water Resources Bureau, Taipei.

The Class of’02 trained in USA

The Class of’03 trained in USA

The Class of’04 trained in USA

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